Are CGM Users Aware of Time in Range?

Are CGM Users Aware of Time in Range?


This content originally appeared on diaTribe. Republished with permission.

By Eliza Skoler and Rebecca Gowen

dQ&A surveyed 2,540 CGM users with type 1 or type 2 diabetes to find out how aware they are of their own time in range: 87% of respondents knew how much time they spend in range daily

Time in range is the percentage of time that a person spends in their target blood glucose range (70-180 mg/dl). This measurement of diabetes management along with time below range and time above range helps people assess patterns and trends throughout the day to inform daily treatment decisions in a way that A1C cannot. It is also becoming more well-known and accepted in the world of diabetes as a good indicator of diabetes management.

dQ&A, a market research company, wanted to measure people’s awareness of their own time in range. They surveyed 2,540 people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who use continuous glucose monitors (CGM). The following question was posed to respondents: “Do you know roughly what percentage of your day (on average) you typically spend with your blood sugar between 70-180 mg/dl?” For those people who answered yes, dQ&A then asked them what percentage of time they typically spend in the target range (70-180 mg/dl) each day. It is important to note that the majority of people included in this survey were White, had type 1 diabetes, and were using an insulin pump.

Important survey results included:

  • 87% of all respondents knew roughly how much time they spent in range each day, while 13% did not. These results were generally consistent across several factors including people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, adults and children, and people with type 2 diabetes who were or were not taking insulin.
  • 29% of respondents reported that they typically spend 71-80% of their day in range. 30% of the people surveyed reported a time in range above 80% while 41% of respondents reported a time in range lower than 71%.
  • People with type 2 diabetes who are not taking insulin are significantly more likely to report spending 91-100% of their day in range (36%), compared to adults with type 1 diabetes or people with type 2 diabetes on insulin (9% and 11%, respectively).
  • Time in range was higher in older age groups. The group with the lowest self-reported time in range was people under the age of 18: only 44% of people 18 years or younger spent more than 70% of the day in range, compared to 56% of people ages 18-44, 62% of people ages 45-65, and 68% of people over the age of 65.

Our takeaways from this data:

  • Among people who use CGM, the majority acknowledge time in range as a measurement of their glucose control. However, we believe more people can be educated on how to understand and act on their time in range data.
  • The majority of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes report achieving the  time in range target of more than 70% and this was particularly true for those in older age groups.
  • An important focus should be placed on helping young people find strategies to improve their time in range and incorporate it into their self-management.

To learn more about time in range click here.

Post Views: 16

Read more about A1c, continuous glucose monitor (CGM), diabetes survey, insulin, insulin pumps, Intensive management, time in range.



Source link